The Trial of Prisoner 043



Beyond the economic cost to the American people (more than five trillion dollars thus far) and military deaths (over 4,400 US soldiers), the war in Iraq claimed at least one million civilian casualties including children; decimated a culture; and aggravated anti-American hostilities. What if George W. Bush ordered the war based not on assumptions but outright lies? Should—and could—a former US president be held accountable in a court of international law for war crimes?

My Review

To enjoy this book you have to take the concept with a grain of salt. Meaning, there will be unbelievable aspects of the storyline but this is a fiction book. Yes, it presents to you the "what if" but truly to be honest, I don't believe that this would ever happen to a past or present President. Yet, again the "what if" of this story is interesting. For example, I never really gave much thought to International Criminal Court.

Although, really it was a bit far-fetched to believe that a group of British paramilitary commandos could kidnapped former president, Bush in broad daylight. Then the United States tries to get the former president back but they pull back when they realize that they don't want to start something. So, it is aspects of the story like this that make the story unbelievable. However, as I stated if you can get past this and just take the story for what it is, then you will find that it is a very good read. One that I could not stop reading. What I enjoyed the most is that Mr. Jastrow captures the essence of Bush. He was the man that I have respected as a President. He held his faith and convictions throughout the whole trial.



Screenwriter, playwright, and celebrated Emmy Award-winning producer/director who traces his roots back to the Mayflower and an American president, Terry Jastrow, explores this unprecedented scenario in his gripping debut novel.


Read an excerpt.


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